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Organizational SOG’s

Standard Operating Guidelines

East Kentucky Trackers

November 19th, 2011

Prepared By Clay Corbett, Organization Founder

I. Purpose:

a.The purpose of the Standard Operating Guidelines (SOGs) are to provide a set of guidelines for field operations of the East Kentucky Trackers (E.K.T.), hereafter known as the ”Team”. These SOGs are intended to address the five standard components of Search and Rescue Operations:

1. Preparation & Preplanning

2. Notification 

3. Planning & Strategy 

4. Tactics & Operation

5. Suspension & Critique.

b. It is important to note that this document is entitled “Standard Operating Guidelines” rather than “Standard Operating Procedures.” The term, “Procedures” might be interpreted as hard and fast rules to be applied to all of the Team’s SAR Operations. And, while this term can be applied logically in other disciplines, it is neither logical nor practical to set down specific procedures to be followed in SAR activities. This is due to the very nature of those activities-the innumerable ways SAR operations can be safely and efficiently conducted using a wide variety of equipment and rescue personnel on all types of terrain in infinitely-varying weather conditions and for victims experiencing a limitless variety of maladies.

c. These SOGs are designed with safety as the highest priority. Members wishing to maintain a membership in the Team must abide by these SOGs. At any time, members may be dismissed from the scene by the Squad Commander should he/she compromise the safety of a rescue or training operations.

d. Any changes to these SOGs will be brought to the attention of all members of the Team at the next regularly scheduled Team meeting, formally filed with Kentucky Emergency Management and placed on the Team’s Official Website: http://www.EastKentuckyTrackers.com

II. Legal Obligation:

 a. The Team is obligated to obey Kentucky Revised Statue KRS 39F, which sets forth the legal obligations and technical requirements for an Emergency Responding Agency affiliated with Kentucky Emergency Management Division. b. These SOGs have been created and are being maintained to fulfill the obligations set forth in KRS 39F.120 par. 2, which reads: Each Rescue Squad shall develop written standard operating procedures which specify as a minimum:

1. Procedures and Rules for notification and response to emergencies

2. Procedures for all operations and response activities of the squad in accordance with the mission statement

III. Reporting Requirements:

a. The Team is required to report changes to these SOGs in accordance with KRS 39R.120 par. 3, which reads: “A current copy of the bylaws and a current copy of all standard operating procedures shall be sent by the squad to the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management. Amendments to the Bylaws and Standard Operating Procedures shall be sent to the Division within ten (10) working days of their adoption. The Division shall maintain a file of Rescue Squad Bylaws and Standard Operating Procedures. These files shall be public records. Copies of the Bylaws and Standard Operating Procedures of the squad, updated as required in this subsection, shall also be sent concurrently to the local Emergency Management Director.”

IV. Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ):  

 a. These SOGs are created and maintained by the Team’s AHJ(s),which is a committee comprised of the Founder and (4) four Members of the Review Board.

 b. The SOGs are intended to be living document with amendments made as deemed necessary and prudent by the Team to provide safe and efficient technical rescue services to the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

V. Preparation & Preplanning:

a. All Team Members are required to fully understand and agree to and abide by the responsibilities and limitations of their assigned individual roles at an incident. Team Members should understand that performing operations outside their scope of practice or training is normally not permitted, and doing such can jeopardize the successful completion of an incident response and possibly increase the Team’s legal liability.  

b. It is the Squad Commander’s responsibility, with advice from Team members who are qualified by training and experience in SAR Operations, to assign roles to Team Members for a particular incident at the time the Incident Action Plan (IAP) is developed at the incident scene.

c. Each response to a SAR incident will require a unique combination of skill sets, dependent on the nature of this particular operation and the availability of skills possessed by particular Team Members.

d. It is a goal of the Team to have as many members trained and qualified in as many SAR skill sets as possible, so that all the roles needed for a particular incident can be filled from the Team Members who show up to the incident. Furthermore, the Team shall strive to meet the minimum training requirements set forth by the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management for Search & Rescue Squads and the Bylaws of the East Kentucky Trackers (E.K.T.).

e. Individual Team Member roles are listed below along with skill sets required to fulfill each role and general duties to be performed. More specific details for duties shall appear later in these SOGs.

1. Squad Commander:   

 I. Required Skills & Training    

 a. Basic Leadership Skills     

b. Knowledge of the NIMS Incident Command System (ICS)    

 c. Certified in NIMS 100, 200, 700 & 800     

d. Basic Search & Rescue, Certified through KyEM or National Recognized Organization     

e. Man-Tracking, Certified through KyEM         

II. Duties:    

a. Manage the entire Tracking or Team’s SAR Operation in the field    

 b. Delegate responsibilities to other Team Members as deemed prudent & necessary to effect a safe,  efficient and successful operation.     

c. For each incident, set up & either manage or appoint a Team Member to manage Team Operations  by performing, at a minimum, these duties:   

1. Determine location of ICP and direct Team Members there.                   

2. Check-in all Team Members who will be participating in this particular operation.                   

3. Organize radio communications and provide radio instructions to Team Members.                   

 4. With input from qualified Team Members, formulate an Incident Action Plan (See VII below)                       

5. Appoint a Team Leader for each Team (North, South, East & West) if previous assigned      Team Leader is unavailable for response, In which the senior, most qualified, Team      Member shall be chosen.     

d. Dispatch Teams as appropriate for this particular operation.     

e. Monitor activities at incident scene from with-in IC via radio.    

 f. Work with Team Leaders to change the IAP (Incident Action Plan) as needed to fit the evolving  circumstances of an incident.     

g. At the conclusion of the operation, make sure everyone is checked back in from the incident scene   and conduct a debriefing as per team SOGs.  

 h. Direct Team Member(s) to gather and inventory equipment deployed at this particular operation.     Enter the information pertaining to use of equipment and cordage in the Team’s logs.    

 i. Work with Incident Command (IC) as a member of joint operations.

2. Communications Officer:

   I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Good communication skills

b. Knowledge of the emergency radio services used by the Team, including any and all UHF/VHF emergency

portable radios and FRS/GMRS radios.

c. Solid working knowledge of emergency radio communications and protocols.

II. Duties:

a. Works with Squad Commander to set up an facilitate communications between all Teams participating in this particular operation.

b. Maintain a working chart of frequencies in use in this particular operation.

 3. Safety Officer- Tracking/Search Operations:

I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Must have successfully completed Man-Tracking along with  Basic Search & Rescue Certified through  KyEM or Nationally Recognized SAR Organization.

b. Good Physical Condition

II. Duties:

 a. Monitor all operations in the field to ensure that safety in maintained throughout this particular operation.

b. Call attention to conditions that are unsafe.

c.  Stop the operation if it is deemed the risk is too high to the Team Members.

d. Remedy or arrange to have the unsafe condition remedied.

e. Resume Operation

 4. Safety Officer-Technical Rope Rescue Systems

I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Must have successfully completed Basic, Intermediate & Advanced Rope Rescue Courses as required by KyEM, such as the TRR: TL course offered by Rescue 3 International.

b. Certified by the Team’s Training Officer to have met the NFPA 1006 Level II Rescue Technician-Rope Standards.

c. Good physical condition

d. Experienced in performing as Safety Officer in rescues and recoveries involving high-angle technical rope rescue systems.

II. Duties:

a. Monitor all operations in the field, in particular those operations involving high angle or low angle technical rope systems and those near dangerous cliffs, to ensure that safety is maintained throughout this operation.

b. Call attention to conditions that are unsafe.

d. Stop the operation if it is deemed the risk is too high to the Team Members.

e. Remedy or arrange to have the unsafe condition removed.

                                                           
 
                    4. Safety Officer-Moving Water Rescue

 I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Must have successfully completed the MWRA/MWRT or poses an MWR-I Certification through KyEm or National Certification through Rescue 3 International.

b. Certified by the Team’s Training Officer to have met NFPA, Ky. Fire Commission &/or KyEM Standards.

c. Good physical condition

d. Experienced in performing as Safety Officer in rescues and recoveries involving Moving Water Rescues.

  II. Duties:

a. Monitor all operations in the field, in particular those operations involving moving water rescues or any  operations performed on or near a waterway and to ensure that safety is maintained throughout this operation.

b. Call attention to conditions that are unsafe.

d. Stop the operation if it is deemed the risk is too high to the Team Members.

e. Remedy or arrange to have the unsafe condition removed.

5. Rope Rescue Technician Level I: (References NFPA 1006 4.3.1 Level I). This level shall apply to individuals who identify

Hazards, use equipment, and apply limited techniques specified in this standard to perform technical rescue operations. 

I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Trained by a reputable rescue organization to all requirements set forth by the NFPA in their NFPA 1006 Level I Rescue Technician-Rope Standard.

b. Certified by Team’s Training Officer to have met NFPA 1006 Level I Rescue Technician-Rope Standards.

c. Excellent physical condition.

d.Experienced in technical rope rescue & recovery operations.        

 e. Must have successfully completed Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Rope Rescue Courses as required by KyEM Administrative Regulations 106KAR390:1 or an equivalent approved KyEM, such as the TRR:TL course offered by Rescue 3 International.

II. Duties:

a. Participate, within your scope of practice/training level certification, operational elements involving technical rope rescue techniques and equipment, in particular those needed at a cliff rescue incident.

b. With assistance from Level II Rescue Technicians, design, build & operate rope rescue systems to facilitate a safe evacuation of a patient & transportation to definitive medical care.

 
 

6.  Rope Rescue Technician Level I: (References NFPA 1006 4.3.1 Level II). This level shall apply to individuals who identify hazards, use equipment, and apply limited techniques specified in this standard to perform technical rescue operations.

I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Trained by a reputable rescue organization to all requirements set forth by the NFPA in their NFPA 1006 Level I Rescue Technician-Rope Standard.

b. Certified by Team’s Training Officer to have met NFPA 1006 Level II Rescue Technician-Rope Standards.

c. Excellent physical condition.

d. Experienced in technical rope rescue & recovery operations.

e. Must have successfully completed Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Rope Rescue Courses as required by KyEM Administrative Regulations 106KAR390:1 or an equivalent approved KyEM, such as the TRR:TL  course offered by Rescue 3 International

II. Duties:

a. Participate, within your scope of practice/training level certification, operational elements involving technical rope rescue techniques and equipment, in particular those needed at a cliff rescue incident.

b. Design, build & operate rope rescue systems to facilitate a safe evacuation of a patient and transportation to definitive medical care.

  7. Tracking/Search Team Leader:

 

I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Trained and Certified by KyEM in BSAR or KyEM approved nationally recognized organization.

b. Trained and Certified by KyEM in Man-Tracking

c. Excellent physical condition.

d. Excellent communication skills.

II. Duties:

a. Organize and manage the individual Teams, (North/South/East/West), in which you are assigned to.

b. Direct and maneuver the teams actions to complete the objective set forth by the Squad Commander.

c. Control team movement during Type I, Type II or Type III Searches or Tracking Operations.

d. Appoint Comms. Tech and Navigator for the individual Team.

e. Coordinate with Squad Commander who will be managing the overall search/tracking operation from IC.

                   
 
 
 

8. Medic:

  I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Certified as one of the following:

1. A Wilderness First Responder by a training organization recognized by the (WMS) Wilderness Medical Society.  2. An EMT or Paramedic by the Kentucky Board of Emergency Medical Services.

b. Excellent physical condition

c. Experienced in SAR operations

 II. Duties:

a. Perform first aid on persons found to be injured within his/her scope of practice.

b. Facilitate evacuation of patient to definitive care.

 c. Stay with patient the entire time from contact to transfer to EMS, unless it is necessary or prudent to transfer care to a person with equal or higher first aid medical certification. d. Keep SOAP notes on injured person to turn over to EMS personnel when transferring patient to EMS.

 

 9. General Rescuer/Tracker:

Required Skills & Training:

a. Willing to follow orders of qualified Team leaders.

b. Good physical condition. c. Willing to carry gear and supplies to a wilderness incident scene.

 d. Willing to help carry a patient in a litter from a scene to an awaiting ambulance.

 e. Willing to learn more skill sets needed by the Team.

II. Duties:

a.Anything the Team needs to have done to conduct a safe, efficient operation as directed by the Team Leader or Squad Commander.

b. In advance preparation for SAR operation Team members should:

1. Thoroughly understand the guidelines and rules listed herein.

2. Possess and Maintain at all times a 24 hour ready pack with minimum items described in the  Team Equipment List.

3. Understand the rudiments of the (ICS) Incident Command System.

4. All members should study, train and prepare for SAR operations, using guidelines for Team

Operations:

a. The SARTECH III Objectives established by the National Association for Search & Rescue or the KyEM BSAR training.

b. Man-Tracking

c. The Team’s Bylaws and SOGs
 
10. Moving Water Rescue Awareness (MWRA):

 

I. Required Skills & Training

a. Certified by KyEM as MWRA Technician or Swift-water Awareness thru Kentucky Fire Commission under NFPA 1670 & 1006.  b. Good physical condition.

c. Willing to carry gear and supplies to a water rescue area.

d. Willing to help carry a patient in a litter from a water scene to an awaiting ambulance.

e. Willing to learn more skill sets needed by the Team.

II. Duties:

a.Perform throw-bag operations from the shore.

b. Operate as Safety for water team as an Upstream & Downstream Spotter.

 c. Assist MWR-T set up and maintain technical rigging for a technical rope rescue from the shore.

d. Perform these and other operations from shore, if with-in 10’ of water must dawn PPE as outlined in equipment requirements with-in the water rescue section of the SOGs.

 

11. Moving Water Rescue Technician (MWRT):

I. Required Skills & Training:

a.Certified by KyEM as MWRT or Certified as a SRT-1 through Rescue 3 International or Swift-water    Technician thru Kentucky Fire Commission under NFPA 1670 & 1006.

b.Good physical condition.

c. Willing to carry gear and supplies to a water rescue area.

d. Willing to help carry a patient in a litter from a water scene to an awaiting ambulance.

e. Willing to learn more skill sets needed by the Team.

f. Capable of sizing up a flood & flood rescue.

g. Capable of performing maneuvers in Self Rescue & Personal Safety.

h. Capable of Reading a River and Understanding of Hydrology.

i. Capable of performing a Rope Rescue & performing skill techniques.

 j. Completed a Boat Operations course either through the KyEM or Ky. Fish & Wildlife.

k. Capable of performing under high risk situations.

                  

II. Duties:

a. Perform scene size up prior to rescue operation.

b. Develop a (POA) Plan of Action for the rescue at hand with secondary Options.

c. Perform all in water operations whether as a Rescue Swimmer or Boat Operator.

d. When Technical Rope Operations are required, the MWRT is required to perform equipment check prior to operation to insure rigging systems are correctly installed.

e. Ensure safety of all team members during the water operation. 

 d. Perform these and other operations from shore, if with-in 10’ of water must dawn PPE as outlined in equipment requirements with-in the water rescue section of the SOGs.

  12. Moving Water Instructor (MWI): I. Required Skills & Training:

a. Certified by KyEM as MWI or Certified as a SRI through Rescue 3 International or Swift-water Instructor thru Kentucky Fire Commission under NFPA 1670 & 1006.

b. Good physical condition.

c. Willing to carry gear and supplies to a water rescue area.

d. Willing to help carry a patient in a litter from a water scene to an awaiting ambulance.

e. Willing to learn more skill sets needed by the Team.

f. Capable of sizing up a flood & flood rescue.

g. Capable of performing maneuvers in Self Rescue & Personal Safety.

h. Capable of Reading a River and Understanding of Hydrology.

i. Capable of performing a Rope Rescue & performing skill techniques.

 j. Completed a Boat Operations course either through the KyEM or Ky. Fish & Wildlife.

k. Capable of performing under high risk situations.  

                    

II. Duties:

 

a.Perform scene size up prior to rescue operation.

b. Develop a (POA) Plan of Action for the rescue at hand with secondary Options.

c. Perform all in water operations whether as a Rescue Swimmer or Boat Operator.

d. When Technical Rope Operations are required, the MWRT is required to perform equipment check prior to operation to insure rigging systems are correctly installed.

e. Ensure safety of all team members during the water operation.

f. Considered the Senior Qualified MWRT on scene of a water rescue operation.

g. Has full control of scene and makes final determination of safe operation maneuvers & technical rescues.

h. Shall train and certify other team members in MWRA & MWRT for KyEM Certification.  

VI. Distress Call, Callouts & Notification:

  a. Distress Call: 1. When East Kentucky Tracker Squad Commander receives notification of agency requesting help to be sent to an incident requiring a SAR mission, he/she calls the Team Leaders (or one of his/her designees in his/her absence) And communicates the details of the incident, including location and the nature of the incident.

2. The Distress Call or Callout may come from several sources:

a. A private individual or individuals calling in on a landline phone.

b. A U.S. Forest Service, Cumberland District Law Enforcement Officer.

c. A 911 Dispatcher from surrounding Kentucky Counties.

d. Local, Regional or State Emergency Managers requesting assistance.

3. The Squad Commander determines whether or not the Team should respond to the incident. This may require Phone discussion with other responding agencies and also with Team Leaders.

b. Call-Out:

1. The Team maintains an emergency group text system which shall be sent out over member’s cell phones, when call-out    is requested. All members expecting to respond to calls are expected to acquire and maintain a current cell phone, as the group text is the primary method employed to dispatch the Team.
2. When the Squad Commander, upon deciding that an incident should be responded to, will send a message out to the Team member’s cell.
3. The message displayed on the text should include enough details for Team Members to prepare for the operation. At the very least, the message should include three (3) important details:
a. Rendezvous Location: This may be a location near the scene or with-in the Teams quadron (sector) in which everyone with-in that team can meet at that particular location. This way that Teams close to the incident location may proceed to the scene and initiate the operation, while the 3 other teams are organizing meeting locations and car-pooling to the incident location.
b. Nature of the Incident: This is important to know so that the Team member can prepare for the type operation anticipated. For example: Lost Child in the woods, Alzheimer Patient in the city, etc… The type of operation will determine the type of gear and supplies needed.
d. Cell Number: The cell phone number of the Squad Commander & Team Leader for each sector (north/south/east/west) teams.
                                        4. If time and situation permits, an attempt to use a phone tree may be added as a back-up method.
 
 
                    C. Notification:
1. The Squad Commander (or his/her designee), at his/her earliest convenience, will notify Pike County Emergency Management Director of the details of a SAR operation & its location so that this can be reported to the Kentucky Division of Emergency Management and an official incident number obtained.
                    D. Outside Jurisdiction Requesting Help:
1. An officer of another jurisdiction outside Pike County may call Pike County 911 Dispatch or Pike County EM or SAR Coordinator and request the services of the Team, whereupon
a. Pike County 911 Dispatch, Pike County EM or Pike County SAR Coordinator will notify the Squad Commander and communicate the details of the incident, including location & the nature of the incident.
b. The Call-out & Notification procedure will then proceed as per Provision VI, Sections A, B & C.
VII. Departure to the Incident Scene:
A. A Team reminder checklist, which summarizes the necessary gear for a callout has been prepared to help Team members’ double    check their inventory immediately before they respond to a call.
B. All Team members must have a jump pack packed and ready at all times with the minimum gear listed below.
                    1. Copy of Team SOG’s
                    2. FRS radio, tuned to channel 2
                    3. 2 headlamps
                    4. Spare batteries for headlamps and radios.
                    5. Tracking stick (minimum 4’)
                    6. Rain gear
                    7. First Aid Kit
                    8. Orienteering Compass
                    9. Whistle
                    10. Folding Knife
                    11. 3 pairs of vinyl gloves
                    12. Bandana
                    13. 10’ of duct tape
                    14. 3 Light Sticks; matches
                    15. 2 plastic bag (waste basket liners)
                    16. Bag w/ 25’ of 6mm nylon cord
                    17. Roll of athletic tape
                    18. 1 package of moist wipes
                    19. 2 packages of disinfectant wipes
                    20. One roll of BLUE ribbon
                    21. Minimum of 32 oz. Water
                    22. Minimum of 2 energy bars or jells
C. The Team member will drive to the Rendezvous Point listed on the text call-out message.
1. The Team neither condones nor accepts from its members driving outside the limits of the law including, but not limited, to regulations applying to:
                    a. Speeding
                    b. Driving Under the Influence (ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY) of Drugs and/or Alcohol.
2. Team members must get to the incident in a safe and responsible manner.
3. Team members may use 360 degree viewing flashing  Red, Amber or White lights on their vehicle only during actual emergency operations and must also do this with written permission of the East Kentucky Review Board, signed by the chair.
VIII. Arrival at the Rendezvous Point:
A. In most, but not all cases the Squad Commander will designate the Rendezvous Point as the Incident Command Post (ICP). If another location for an ICP is chosen, the Commander , or his/her designee, will notify all team members gathered at the Rendezvous Point to proceed to this ICP location. The Incident Commander shall always report to the Incident Location or prior established IC location.
B. If Team arrives on the scene prior to the Squad Commander, then the Team Leader or senior qualified Team member shall fill the position as ON SCENE COMMANDER until the Squad Commander or his/her designee arrives. At which time the On Scene Commander shall relinquish responsibility of Scene Commander to the Squad Commander or his/her designee.
C. All Team members who wish to participate in the SAR operation are expected to check in with the Squad Commander, or his/her designee, and confirm that their name, unit number, date & time of day are recorded on the ICS Form 211. Absolutely no one will be permitted to leave the ICP or Staging Area and proceed to the incident scene with-out signing in on ICS Form 211. This is written confirmation that a member is officially recognized as an active participant in this operation.
D. No Team member shall be permitted to participate in a SAR operation or training who has consumed alcohol with-in six (6) hours prior to being dispatched out to that operation.
E. The use of alcohol or drugs by any Team member during a rescue operation or training exercise is strictly prohibited.
IX. Formation of Incident Action Plan (IAP)
A. The Squad Commander , or his/her designee, with input from the person(s) reporting the incident and senior team members, will formulate an IAP, which will include no less than:
                    1. The nature of the incident (i.e. search, tracking, technical rope rescue, water rescue, body recovery, etc.)
                    2. Determination if Emergency Medical Services (EMS) are required & who will be called when.
3. Determination of what (if any) other resources are needed, including other county SAR units, Sheriff, State Police, EMS, USDA Forest Service LEO’s, Coroner & Private Volunteers.
4. Identification of the location of the incident or the area to be searched on a map (with GPS/UTM coordinates, if possible.)
5. Identification of the type and presence at the IC of equipment and supplies needed to conduct the mission.
6. Designation of the Primary Tracking/Search Team composed of a minimum of 3 team members who poses the highest skill level, training, SAR certifications, medical certifications & physical fitness whose function is:                                                                                a. In the case of a rescue or recovery, to reconnoiter the actual incident scene and radio back to IC more details        on status of injured person(s) and specific equipment & resource requests.
b. In the case of a search, to act as a Tracking Team or Hasty Team that conducts an initial sign cutting or hasty search of the high probability area or last known position (LKP) for the missing person(s).
                                        7. Assignment of tasks to all Team members present.
                                        8. Assignment of a Safety Officer, if prior appointed  Safety Officer isn’t present.
                                        9. Assignment of Team Leader(s) to the teams of North/South/East/West, if official Team Leader(s) aren’t present.
X. Initiating Incident Action Plan:
                    A. Dispatch teams from IC or Staging Area to the scene of the incident or the area of the search.
                                        1. No team member will leave IC or Staging Area with-out a specific, well-understood objective & assignment.
                                        2. The Tracking/Search/Rescue Team will all carry FRS 2way radios tuned to channel 2 with no privacy codes.
3. The Individual Team’s Comms. Officer shall carry a predetermined Team UHF/VHF 2way radio and keep in continual radio contact with Squad Commander via the National Mutual Aid Frequencies of:
                    Channel (Mhz)             Label         PLTone:                        (VHF)
                    155.4750                       VMA          156.7          Ky Calling
                    155.7525                       VCall         156.7          National Calling
                    151.1375                       VTAC1      156.7          National Tactical
                    154.4525                       VTAC2      156.7          National Tactical
                    158.7375                       VTAC3      156.7          National Tactical
                    159.4725                       VTAC4      156.7          National Tactical
                    Channel MOTranmit:                    MO Receive:                PL Tone:   Label:        Description:                    (UHF)
                    458.3000                                           453.3000                       162.2          UMA          Ky Calling/Tactical
                    458.2125                                           453.2125                       156.7          UCALL      National Calling
                    458.4625                                           453.4625                       156.7          UTAC-1     National Tactical
                    458.7125                                           453.7125                       156.7          UTAC-2     National Tactical
                    458.8625                                           453.8625                       156.7          UTAC-3     National Tactical
 4. All Team members must remain in visual sight of each other, unless circumstances dictate otherwise, in which case the Squad Commander, or his/her designee, will give approval.
5. If a member of each Team finds himself out of visual sight of another Team member, he should call on his/her FRS radio to the fellow Team members and re-establish contact before the Team continues with its mission.
XI. On-Scene Behavior:
                    A. Professionalism and clear-headed responsibility must be practiced at all times during an incident.
1. For incidents requiring technical rescue skills, only team members who have been certified as Technicians or Instructors in that field will be permitted to perform the operation.
2. For incidents requiring search skills, only team members who have successfully completed the KyEM BSAR or National Equivalent program will be permitted to conduct searches.
3. For all incidents, all Team members are expected to perform with-in their abilities and never perform any function for which they have not successfully completed formal training.
4. For all incidents, only those Team members who have certified to perform medical services on a victim may do so, and then only to the scope of their practice. Members must fully comply with any applicable protocols assigned to their certifications.
B. The overall planning and operational authority of a field response belongs to the requesting agency. On the occasion that Team provides the initial response, team members need to be familiar with overall search & rescue management.
C. The overall incident will be run under the Incident Command System (ICS). Team members need to be familiar with form and vocabulary of the ICS in order to function smoothly with other agencies. Members are referred to NIMS ICS for further clarification. In addition, the Team Basic handout, Glossary of ICS Terms, is both recommended reading and a useful reference. Know that the SQUAD COMMANDER is in charge of all team operations and the SAFETY OFFICER is allowed to stop any unsafe behavior.
D. Continuum of Command:
1. On scene changes in the command structure, including position exchanges, must be clearly communicated to all involved.
2. Both members, the one giving up the position, and the one undertaking the position must be aware of the exchange.
3. All others in the Team’s chain of command must be notified as well.
XII. Emergency Contingency Plans
 
A. It is important to ensure that all of our team members, in the act of searching for or rescuing victims, do not become victims themselves. Search and rescue operations are inherently dangerous and we should prepare for the possibility that a team member may become lost or injured during a mission.
 
B. Contingency plan for individual Team member becoming lost during a search:
 
                                        1. If you become lost or separated from your team, STOP! Do not go any farther. Stay on or near a trail.
 
2. If you have an emergency portable radio, try to contact other members of your team via the talk-around channel on your VHF/UHF emergency portable radio. If no VHF/UHF radio, use an FRS/GMRS radio on Channel 2. If no answer, report your situation, via the main SAR channel, to the Squad Commander at the IC.
 
                                        3. If you have a GPS unit, radio your coordinates to your team and/or IC, using UTM or GPS Coordinates
 
                                        4. Perform a look-around and try to regain your bearings.
 
5. If you have no radio, blow your whistle using three short blasts at approximately 30-second intervals. Listen carefully for a response.
 
6. Be honest and realistic about your situation and physical condition. Attempt to walk out only if you have not reestablished contact with your fellow Team members and only if know exactly where you are and that you can make it physically. If you do not happen to make it out, notify Incident Base immediately via radio.
 
C. Contingency Plan for Team for a lost Team member during search:
 
                                        1. When you realize that a Team member is missing, stop.
 
2. Try to contact the missing Team member via the talk-around channel on an emergency portable radio, and if no answer, try contacting him on Channel 2 of a FRS/GMRS radio.
 
3. Report the Team’s location – ideally with UTM/GPS coordinates – and the name of the missing team member  to the IC via emergency portable radio.
 
                                        4. Immediately begin shouting the Team member’s name and allow time for a response.
 
5. If you cannot locate team member in a short time, abort original mission. The Team’s primary objective now is to find the lost Team member.
 
 
 
D. If a team member is injured:
 
                                        1. Stop and give first aid to member, if you are certified to do so.
 
                                        2. Contact the Squad Commander at the IC via radio and discuss the situation.
 
3. If the injured member is ambulatory, then evaluate option of two team members with radio walking him back to IC and the remaining members continuing the operation.
 
4. If the injured member will require a litter evacuation, then radio IC for EMS and Team personnel and a wheeled-litter to be sent to your present location.
 
5. If there are is not enough manpower or equipment to conduct both the evacuation of the injured Team member and also the original operation, be that search or cliff rescue/evac, and then request that the Incident Commander call in additional resources.
 
                                        6. In discussions with the Incident Commander and Squad Commander, revise the initial IAP and resume the operation.
 
XIII. On completion of a SAR operation:
A. The Team Leader, with assistance from the Safety Officer, must verify that all who checked in on ICS Form 211 are accounted at the location of the termination of the SAR operation. This may be at a point other than the ICP, in which case, the Team members will be directed by the Team Leader to proceed to the ICP. The Team Leader will direct members to depart, as a group, the incident scene and return directly to the ICP and to stay there until the operation debriefing is conducted.
B. All Team members who signed in on ICS Form 211 and thereby are officially recognized as a participant in the operation are required to return to the ICP when directed to do so by the Squad Commander or Team Leader. 
C. Members are not to leave the ICP before participating in the operation debriefing.
D. Under no circumstances shall a member leave the incident without checking out on ICS Form 211. 
E. Any member not officially checked out will be considered to be a lost person, and an appropriate search operation will be initiated.
F. A debriefing will be conducted once all the Team members have returned to the ICP and the patient has been turned over to EMS or, in the case of a lost, but not injured, person, released at the ICP. The debriefing shall include:
                                        1. What went right?
                                        2. What went wrong?
                                        3. What corrective measures should be taken in future operations?
                                        4. What injuries, if any, occurred to the Team members during the operation?
5. What needs to be done to clean, refurbish, replace, or service equipment used and assignment of responsibility to a Team member(s) for doing these tasks? 
                                        6. Resolution of any other loose ends.
                                        7. Official dismissal of the Team members.
G. It is the responsibility of the Squad Commander, or his designee, too collect all relevant information, including patient information, for post incident review and report filing to the Review Board and subsequently to county & state Emergency Management Agency.
H. Information on the incident should also be turned over to the Review Board Secretary/Treasurer as soon as conveniently possible.
 
 
 
XIV. Critical Incident Stress Debriefing
A. Members of Team are encouraged to use available resources after any incident that may have been psychologically trying. There are local critical incident stress debriefing teams composed of people trained to help others recover from the psychological trauma that often accompanies emergency work.
 
XV. Appendix A – Emergency Radio Communications Protocols
A. All Squad members using portable radios on SAR operations shall follow the rules and guidelines set forth in this Appendix. 
B. At the discretion of the Squad’s Commander, an emergency 2-way radio may be issued on loan to an active squad member. 
C. Members who have radios on loan, and who become inactive or resign from the Squad shall agree to forfeit their radios to the Squad Commander immediately upon their becoming inactive or resigning.
D. Members are expected to keep their radios in good condition and protect them from damage or theft.
E. Members shall follow all rules for operation of emergency radios as set forth by the Federal Communications Commission.
F. Members shall strive to keep all communications to a minimum, so as not to tie up the emergency frequencies.
G. Members shall never use profanity, make inappropriate remarks, or engage in unnecessary banter in their transmissions.
H. Members should use Main Channel only when absolutely necessary to communicate to the 911 Dispatcher.
I. At the scene of an incident, Team members should use FRS for communications amongst themselves, tuned to channel 2.
J. Plain language will be used at all times on all radio systems. No 10 codes other than the occasional 10-4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XVI. Appendix B – Operating Guidelines for Technical Rope Rescues
a. No specific rules and/or procedures are presented in this Appendix B. Rather, what is set forth is a set of guidelines that can also be thought of as suggestions. Due to the infinitely-variable nature of technical rope rescues it is virtually impossible to create a set of specific rules and procedures comprehensive enough to cover every conceivable rescue scenario.
b. The Team shall strive toward using those tools, techniques, and procedures that:
i. Provide the maximum safety to rescuers, victims, and bystanders while providing to a victim the fastest and safest rescue, packaging, and transport to definitive care.
ii. Within reasonable limits of access to information, follow the most widely-used and accepted practices and techniques by rope rescue teams around the U.S. in creating and managing the operation of rope rescue systems.
iii. Follow the practices taught by the more prominent rope rescue training providers, such as Rescue 3 International, On Rope 1, and Rigging for Rescue.
                                        iv. When possible and applicable, follow guidelines and standards set forth in this document.
c. Inasmuch as the Team was formed in 2007 and only started in May 2009, to achieve compliancy with Kentucky statutes, NFPA standards, and widely-accepted technical rope rescue practices, a diligent and expeditious effort shall be undertaken by the Team to achieve this goal. In the interim, the Team shall, as much as reasonably possible and as applicable, comply with laws, standards, and practices set forth in:
                                        i. KRS 39F
                                        ii. 106KAR 1:390, Sections 2, 4, 8, 9, and 10.
                                        iii. NFPA 1670
                                        iv. NFPA 1006
                                        v. Widely-accepted and field-proven techniques and procedures used by other rescue squads.
d. In rescue operations, equipment from the Team’s equipment cache and from the Team’s rescuers’ personal property should be used.
i. Rescue equipment labeled as meeting the NFPA standard: 1983 - Standard on Life Safety Rope and Equipment for Emergency Services should be used whenever such equipment is available in the Team’s               equipment inventory and available at the scene of an incident. Other equipment and cordage may also be used, so long as the Technical Team Leader deems this equipment and cordage to be sufficiently safe for use in the operation.
ii. All rescue equipment, whenever possible, should be used within its limitations as set forth in NFPA 1983 - especially with attention paid to “General” and “Light” use as applied to gear and safety ropes. Such usage should take into account the safety factors set forth in point iii below.
iii. The Static System Safety Factor on a rescue system, taking into account all equipment and ropes should be no less than 10:1 whenever possible. It should be noted that the 10:1 factor is not a hard and fast rule, and in certain circumstances - such as a critically injured person whose evacuation must be expedited - compromises can be made, so long as a rope redundancy factor of no less than 2 and a minimum Dynamic System Safety Factor of 1.5:1 are maintained, to the best estimate of the Technical Team Leader.
iv. The Dynamic System Safety Factor anticipates this worst case event: A 200 kilogram mass drops one meter on three meters of rope, creating a maximum arrest force of about 15 kilo Newtons.
v. The Team should use low-stretch ropes – sometimes referred to as static ropes – for building rope rescue systems. These should be of one of two sizes:
                                                            1. 11 mm diameter rope rated with a minimum breaking strength of 30 Kilo Newtons.
                                                            2. 12.5 mm diameter rope rated with a minimum breaking strength of 40 Kilo Newtons.
 
                                        vi. The team should use other cordage of the sizes and types set forth below:
                                                            1. 8 mm diameter nylon accessory cord should be used for:
                                                                                a. General rescue rope system accessory needs that don’t require the full, un-belayed                                                                                                            support of a life safety load.
                                                                                b. Personal safety edge lines or tether lines.
                                                                                c. In the construction of radium release hitches.
                                                                                d. Building prusiks and tandem prusiks hitches.
                                                            2. 6 or 7 mm diameter nylon accessory cord should be used for:
                                                                                a. General rescue rope system accessory needs that don’t require the full, unbelayed                                                                                                              support of a life safety load.
                                                                                b. A personal auto-block self-belaying rappel device.
                                                                                c. Attaching a personal harness to an 8 mm dia. edge line or safety tether.
                                                            3. 1-inch tubular or flat webbing should be used for:
                                                                                a. General rescue needs where use of flat cordage is desirable.
                                                                                b. Construction of tree anchors, such as the wrap-3-pull-2 system.
                                                                                c. Construction of various seat and chest harnesses.
                                                                                d. Securing a victim to a litter basket.
                                                            4. Utility straps should be used for:
                                                                                a. General utility applications necessary in the building of rope rescue systems.
                                                                                b. Anchor straps.
                                                                                c. Pick-off straps.
                                                            5. Special-use cordage products can be used in building of rope rescue systems, so long as these                                                                                          items meet the Team’s minimum SSSF of 10:1 including:
                                                                                a. Litter bridals.
                                                                                b. Litter spiders.
vii. All Team members actively engaged in technical rope rescues who are in danger of falling from heights should employ gear that meets these equipment requirements:
                                                            1. Personal harnesses must meet NFPA standards for Class II or Class III Life Safety Harnesses or EN                                                                                 12277:2007 or a properly-tied seat and chest harness combination constructed of 1-inch tubular                                                                                       nylon webbing. No other type harness shall be permitted.
                                                            2. If a rescue operation requires a rope rescue technician to attach himself to a rope system to                                                                                            ascend, descend, or become affixed to an ascending or descending litter, or perform duties of an                                                                                               edge attendant, he/she must be fitted with one of these options:
                                                                                a. An NFPA Class III Life Safety Harness.
                                                                                b. A harness meeting either the NFPA Class II Life Safety Harness Standard or the EN                                                                                                          12277:2007 Standard along with a separate chest harness, which can be commercially-                                                                                                                  made or made of 1-inch tubular webbing in a configuration that secures the seat harness to                                                                                    the chest harness.
                                                                                c. An improvised seat harness combined with a chest harness, both of which are properly                                                                                                                         constructed of 1-inch tubular webbing and joined by a “L” or “G” NFPA rated carabiner.
                                                            3. Helmets must conform to UIAA (Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme), CE                                                                                                (European Committee for Standardization), or ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials).
e. All rescuers and victims who are operating in and/or being raised or lowered in a high angle or steep angle environment must be secured to the rescue system by at least two points. In a high angle environment, this is usually done via a mainline and a belay line. This constitutes a rope redundancy factor of 2:1.
i. A patient in a litter should be secured to the system with full victim harness (seat and chest) – either a commercially-made one or one fabricated on scene with 1-inch tubular or flat webbing or with the torso-securing method described on pages 108 to 111 in Reference A in the Appendix of this SOG.
ii. A patient found hanging in a harness - such as a hung-up rappeller - should have his harness inspected to determine if it is a commercially-made harness in good condition and properly secured to the patient’s torso.
iii. If it has been determined in ii above that the harness is adequate, then the rescuer should first secure the cowtail extension of the rescuer’s belay line to the patient’s belay loop or harness tie-in point.       Following this, the rescuer should attach a pick-off strap between a fully rated attachment point on the   rescuer’s harness and the belay loop or tie-in point of the patient’s harness.
iv. If it has been determined in ii above that the patient’s harness is not adequate, then the rescuer should fit the patient with a full victim harness (seat and chest.) This can be either a commercially-made one or one fabricated on scene with 1-inch tubular or flat webbing.
f. In a low-angle environment, the steepness and dangerousness of the working environment should dictate the type of victim and rescuer restraint/safety tether systems to be used. This should be a judgment call on the part of the rescue team leader.
i. A patient in a litter should be secured to the litter with either a seat harness or a full victim harness (seat            and chest), either a commercially-made one or one fabricated on scene with 1-inch tubular or flat webbing                 or with the torso-securing method described on pages 108 to 111 in Reference A in the Appendix of this                   SOG. Which type of harness to use should be a judgment call with consensus taken between the rescue team leader and the attending medic and will take into account the victim’s injuries and the nature of the particular rope system that is employed in the rescue and evacuation of the victim.
                                        ii. An injured victim should be secured tightly so that he cannot move around and exacerbate existing injuries.
                                        iii. All rescuers should be cognizant of dangers, such as steep cliffs alongside the evacuation route and should employ safety tether systems wherever it is deemed by the team leader and/or Safety Officer to be dangerous. Use of safety tether system is described further on in this SOG.
g. In a steep-angle environment (terrain surface is between 30 and 50 degrees from horizontal), which is universally recognized as the most dangerous angle range in which rescue operations, can be conducted, the following system should be used, if at all possible depending on availability of equipment and trained personnel:
                                        i. There should be no more than three rescue litter attendants.
                                        ii. The litter attendants should be attached directly to a bridal system that is directly attached to the litter.
                                        iii. A Mainline of at least 11mm diameter low stretch rope is attached to the bridal.
                                        iv. The Mainline is connected to a mechanical advantage system above the steep angle terrain, which is manned by rescue personnel.
                                        v. The litter attendants should also be attached via Purcell prusiks or lanyards to the Mainline.
                                        vi. In very steep – approaching 50 degrees – and/or rugged terrain, it might be deemed prudent to attach a separate belay rope to the litter via a separate bridal system.
h. The following actions should take place, generally in the order set forth below, during an ideal technical rope rescue operation, keeping in mind that every incident is different and most likely will require varying the type and order of actions taken and that improvisation will be probably be necessary and used only as a last resort, if the preferred gear, personal resource, or technique cannot be applied:
i. The Rope Rescue Technician in charge (Team Leader) along with the Safety Officer should do a scene size-up to determine:
                                                            1. If the scene is safe for rescuers to enter.
                                                            2. The number of victims, bystanders and rescuers
                                                            3. The mechanism of injury (ies)
ii. The Safety Officer should mark off any dangers, such as cliff edges, with reflective pink ribbon and point out these areas to rescuers and bystanders.
iii. The Safety Officer should move all bystanders to a safe location and provide means to keep them there during the operation.
iv. The Safety Officer should, for the entire operation, continually monitor the safety aspects, making sure that no one enters the designated unsafe areas marked off by ribbon unless he/she is on a monitored main line and on a belay or, at the very least, secured to a safety tether line.
v. The Team member with the highest medical certification, who is also certified as a Rope Rescue Technician, should make patient contact as soon as the scene is rendered safe. If this requires that a technical rope system be built and operated to reach the victim, this should be done in lieu of any unapproved, unsafe method is employed to reach the victim.
vi. If the Team Leader determines that a technical rope rescue system should be built, he either assumes the duty of a rigging boss or he appoints another Team member, who has been certified by a reputable rescue training organization to have met the NFPA 1006 Level 2 Rescue Technician - Rope standards to perform the duties of a rigging boss, who:
                                                            1. Supervises the Team in the building and operation of a rope rescue system.
                                                            2. Does not actively participate in the building of the system, but rather keeps and overall                                                                                                                        perspective of the operation, while letting Team members focus on building the individual                                                                                  components of the system
vii. Upon discovering that a victim(s) is injured to the extent that an ambulance is needed, the Team                     Leader should radio the Incident Commander and request an ambulance and any other medical personnel that may be required.
viii. Whenever the incident indicates that the victim has sustained a head, neck or back injury, the victim is to be secured to a backboard and fitted with a cervical spine collar prior to being packaged into a litter. A victim who has sustained a fall from a height greater than fifteen feet fits into this category.
ix. Moving a patient to a backboard and securing him/her thereto and fitting a cervical spine collar must be done, if at all possible, by the Team member having the highest medical credentials.
x. An injured patient is not to be touched, treated, or moved in any manner by a Team member who is not trained and certified in a program that allows such. In the event that no one on the responding Team is qualified to treat and package the patient, the Team Leader should request the Incident Commander to “pull out all the stops” in locating and getting a qualified medic (EMT, WFR, etc.) to the incident scene to treat and package the patient.
xi. If a victim is to be packaged in a litter that will be raised, lowered, and/or transported a set of suggested procedures should be followed to achieve a successful transport of the victim to a definitive care facility. The Raise, Lower, and Transport techniques that should be employed are covered below in separate sections of this document.
i. Picking off a victim (as might be stranded on a ledge or hanging from a rappel rope)
i. A person who has hung from a rope in a harness for a prolonged period of time - about an hour or more - can lose consciousness due to his blood supply to his brain being reduced due to his harness leg straps squeezing veins and arteries in his legs. This is a very serious condition that can result in death - sometimes in as little as an hour. Therefore, it is imperative to move as expeditiously as possible to extricate a person found to be hung up in a harness, and especially if they are unconscious when you arrive at the scene.
                                        ii. Before doing anything else, perform the operations listed above in XVI h. — Size up the scene and stabilize it.
                                        iii. The Rope Rescue Team will perform these tasks concurrently:
                                                            1. If necessary to get close enough to the victim to assess his condition and communicate with him,                                                                                 a safety tether system must be built and used. Find a good natural anchor point and build an                                                                                                     anchor system capable of safely supporting a rescue load (600 pounds) and focused toward the                                                                                     edge of the cliff directly above the victim.  Attach an Edge Safety Tether (EST) to this anchor and                                                                                   attach a rescuer (preferably one with emergency medical credentials) onto the tether, who will                                                                                               approach a cliff edge – but NOT go over the edge by rappelling or being lowered – and try to access                                                                                            the situation and communicate with the victim. The rescuer will access the victim’s condition and                                                                                            relay this information back to the rope rescue technician in charge of the technical operation and                                                                                                the Incident Commander. If the person is conscious, tell him it is imperative that he shift and wiggle                                                                                    around in his harness to encourage blood flow through his legs. Encourage the victim to rotate                                                                                            upside down for a few seconds about his attachment point, if he can do so safely. This will reduce                                                                                     pressure caused by the leg loops on his legs.
                                                            2. Another rescuer will be gathering information about the victim from bystanders who may have                                                                                     been present when the accident occurred
                                                            3. The team, under the direction of the Rope Rescue Team Leader (RRTL), will build two separate                                                                                    anchor systems capable of safely anchoring a full rescue load and focused toward a point on the                                                                                              cliff edge above the victim. (One of these anchor systems can be the same as the one built for the                                                                                           EST in point XVI.j.iii.1 above.)
                                                                                a. One of the anchor systems will be for the Mainline and
                                                                                b. The other anchor system will be for the Belay system.
                                                            4. The Mainline lowering system should consist of either a brake rack or Scarab attached to the                                                                                         mainline anchor, through which a 1/2-inch static mainline rope is fed out to a rescuer who attaches                                                                                     himself to the distal end of the rope it via a terminal figure 8 knot through his harness attachment                                                                                    loop or D-ring.
                                                            5. The belay system should include a dynamic load release hitch (LHR) with its upper end carabiner                                                                                                     attached to the belay anchor system, and its lower end carabiner attached to a tandem prusiks                                                                                            pair. A half-inch static rope exits a rope bag and is engaged by the tandem prusiks. The distal end of                                                                                                    this belay rope is has a terminal figure-8 knot with a quicklock carabiner attached thereto. Back                                                                                          from the end of the belay rope about four feet is tied a figure 8 knot or butterfly knot. A screwlock                                                                                           carabiner is attached through this knot and locked onto the rescuer’s belay loop or D-ring                                                                                                                       attachment point. It should be determined that this rope is long enough to belay a rescuer all the                                                                                        way to the base of the cliff without having to pass a knot through the prusiks.
j. Raising a victim in a litter basket
i. Only those team members who have successfully completed Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Rope Rescue Courses as required by KyEM Administrative Regulation 106KAR390:1 or an equivalent approved by KyEM, such as the TRR: TL course offered by Rescue 3 International should build and operate a raising system. For most high angle rope rescue operations, the raising system described in the manual: “Technical Rescue Riggers Guide” by Rick Lipke can be used, with variations applied as deemed necessary to carry out an efficient, safe rescue operation. These variations should be done under the direct supervision of a Team member who has been specifically trained in building and operating raises using these variations.
ii. Trained team members can receive help from untrained Team members, but should be diligent in                     inspecting any systems built by or operated by untrained Team members. The Team Leader should inspect all elements of a raise system prior to operating it with a rescue load applied.
 
k. Lowering a victim
i. Only those team members who have successfully completed Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Rope Rescue Courses as required by KyEM Administrative Regulation 106KAR390:1 or an equivalent approved by KyEM, such as the TRR: TL course offered by Rescue 3 International should build and operate a lowering            system. For most high angle rope rescue operations, the raising system described in the manual:           “Technical Rescue Riggers Guide” by Rick Lipke can be used, with variations applied as deemed necessary                 to carry out an efficient, safe rescue operation. These variations should be done under the direct             supervision of a Team member who has been specifically trained in building and operating raises using these variations.
ii. Trained team members can receive help from untrained Team members, but should be diligent in                     inspecting any systems built by or operated by untrained Team members. The Team Leader should inspect all elements of a lowering system prior to operating it with a rescue load applied.
 
l. Transporting a victim
i. There are many different safe ways to transport a victim in a litter basket. For most litter transport                     operations, the systems described in the manual: The “Technical Rescue Riggers Guide” by Rick Lipke can be used with variations applied as deemed necessary to carry out an efficient, safe patient transport.               These variations should be done under the direct supervision of a Team member who has been specifically trained in building and operating lowers using these variations.
ii. Only those Team members who classified as Medics (i.e. certified as Wilderness First Responders or                     Emergency Medical Technicians or Paramedics) are permitted to package an injured person into a litter, and then only with the patient’s expressed permission. Team Medics may be assisted by other Team members who have successfully completed training courses that included sections on patient packaging with reputable training organizations. These Team Medics should be diligent in inspecting any patient packaging performed by other Team members prior to initiating a patient transport via litter to definitive     care.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XVII. Appendix C - Operating an ATV
a. All Team members who operate an All-Terrain Vehicle during the course of a rescue operation must have successfully completed an ATV Safety Training program conducted by the ATV Safety Institute or ATV Safety Course provided by Ky. Fire Commission.
b. All Team members who operate an All-Terrain Vehicle must wear proper protective gear including:
i. Approved helmet with visor or goggles
ii. Over-the-ankle boots
iii. Gloves
iv. Long pants - preferably abrasion-resistance
c. All Team members are prohibited from operating an All-Terrain Vehicle within six hours of consuming alcohol.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
XVIII. Appendix D: WATER RESCUE TEAMS
                    I. Basic Organization:
                                        a. Water Rescue Captain:
1. The Water Rescue Captain will oversee all water rescue operations, trainings & preparedness. Duties of the Water Rescue Captain include:
                    i. Responsible for overseeing the water rescue teams, operations & training of all teams.
                    ii. Handling of operations of incidents from the designated IC.
                    iii. Reporting team status to Squad Commander periodically during such operations.
iv. Assist Squad Commander & Review Board in preparation for all grants, equipment applications & meetings involving water rescue.
                                        b. Team Leader:
1. The Team Leader will be responsible for overseeing the operations & safety of his/her assigned team during a water rescue, recovery &/or training exercise. The duties of the Team Leader include, but not limited to:
i. Inspection of all team member’s equipment prior to departure to water rescue or recovery operation.
ii. Determine the safest form of action needed to rescue or recover the victim.
iii. Notify Water Rescue Captain of all equipment defects or unsafe operations of equipment.
iv. Oversee all aspects of the water rescue &/or recovery in which his/her team will be performing.
v. Fill in as Water Captain if such said Water Captain unable to perform his/her duties or unable to respond to incident.
vi. Appoint a Team Leader for his/her replacement if having to fill the position of Water Rescue Captain.
 
                    II. Membership:
a. Team Members include all certified KyEM MWRA, MWRT & MWRI &/or Rescue 3 International’s SRT-1 or SRT-II members with-in the East Kentucky Trackers. Each Team Member is required to maintain their credentials as such through the Kentucky Emergency Management MWRT program. All Members must maintain a CPR certification as a EMS minimum.
III. Composition:
a. The team will consist of 4 general categories of expertise which are: Boat Operator, Rescue Swimmer, Communications Specialist & Ground Support Personnel. Under no circumstance will any member perform duties beyond his/her training or scope of practice, whether it be in a training or in a rescue/recovery operation. Each area of expertise is described as:
                    1. Boat Operator:
i. A Boat Operator is any member of the team who trains and is released to operate and tow a vessel. It is necessary to ensure that all boat operators are capable of handling the craft under extreme adverse conditions day or night. Due to no KyEM standard on credentialing boat operators, release as a boat operator is at the discretion of the Water Captain. It is here-in expressly forbidden that any boat operator, team member or victim enter a boat in the water without at least a PFD. All team members are required to dawn a PFD, Helmet & throw bag before entering any floating vessel.
                                                            2. Rescue Swimmer:
i. Rescue Swimmer personnel are personnel trained specifically to perform rescues as related to swift water operations. Members must be SRT-1 rescue certified through Rescue 3 International or MWRT certified through KyEM. All swift water personnel are expected to follow the guidelines as expressed by Rescue 3 International. No swift water rescue personnel will perform task beyond his/her scope of practice. It is here-in expressly forbidden that any Rescue Swimmer shall enter the water with-out 1 back-up MWRT member being present, a Team Member acting as upstream spotter, a Team Member acting as downstream safety. Nor shall such swimmer enter the water with-out dawning a PFD, Helmet, Gloves or wetsuit at any time. Any deviation from this rule could result in suspension of the member from the (WRT) Water Rescue Team.
                                                            3. Communications Specialist:
i. A Communication Specialist is any member of the team who trains and is proficient in communications. The Communications Specialist must maintain a minimum of MWRA through KyEM. While under a swift water operation the Communications Specialist will be shore based so that he/she may maintain radio contact with IC and boat while under operation. It is here-in expressly forbidden for any team member get with-in 10’ of a waterway with-out dawning a helmet, PFD & Gloves. Any deviation from this rule could result in suspension for the (WRT) Water Rescue Team.   
 
                                        IV. Operations:
                                                            1. Training:
i. Each member is expected to maintain their credentials in MWRA, MWRT or MWRI as established through KyEM. Training will be done by the team as the Water Rescue Captain deems necessary. Each Team Member is required to at least take MWRA (1) once a year to stay informed of any changes. All MWRT & MWRI’s are required to train a minimum of 3 times in a year.
                                                            2. Personal Equipment:
i. Any personal equipment must be approved by the Water Rescue Captain or his/her respected assistant. Team members are required to provide their own gear.
ii. Any Agency equipment used for events other than team training or rescue operations must be approved by the Water Rescue Captain. Any personnel taking equipment out of the Pike County Response Area should also notify the Water Rescue Captain.
                                        V. Activations:
1. In the event a water rescue or recovery activation the team members should follow steps to help insure an efficient, coordinated & safe effort.
                    i. Once activation of team is made, all team members will respond to a rendezvous point.
                    ii. If a boat operation is needed, the boat should not leave until an approved boat operator arrives.
iii. All team members should have a  PFD on at all times while performing a rescue/recovery operation.
iv. Any person that does not feel completely confident in the task he/she are asked to perform then they should notify the Team Leader and refrain from doing the assigned task.
v. All personnel are required to follow safe guidelines as expressed in their specific area of expertise.
                                        
 
VI. Conclusion:
1. The purpose of these procedures are to enhance the quality of training of the team and allow the team to operate as efficiently and safely as possible in a water rescue, search or recovery situation. The procedures are expected to be followed at all times, if and when possible. Failure to do so will be considered on a situation by situation basis, but could result in suspension of the team member from the Water Rescue Team (WRT). As changes to these procedures occur, members of the team will be notified as soon as possible.